Under the plan, called Nissan Energy, owners of Nissan's electric vehicles will be able to connect their cars with energy systems to charge their batteries, power homes and businesses or feed energy back to power grids. The company also says it will develop new ways to reuse electric car batteries.

Nissan already has programmes in the US, Japan and Europe aimed at creating an ecosystem around its range of electric vehicles. Nissan Energy brings these initiatives together as part of the company's Intelligent Mobility strategy.

Nissan Energy will establish new standards for connecting vehicles to energy systems through three key initiatives: Nissan Energy Supply, Nissan Energy Share and Nissan Energy Storage.

High-profile Nissan Energy initiatives extend to a variety of locations, including Nissan's North American headquarters:

  • Franklin, Tennessee: Nissan North America will be piloting the use of Leaf vehicles to assist in powering its headquarters facilities during peak electrical demand times, anticipating significant cost savings
  • Hagen, Germany: Leaf vehicles will be used as a reserve for the German electricity grid, in an innovative pilot project involving Nissan, technology company The Mobility House, energy supplier Enervie and transmission system operator Amprion
  • Japan: Nissan is working with partners such as electric and telecom companies, conducting field tests of vehicle-to-grid and virtual power plant systems to confirm and promote opportunities for electric vehicles to assist with managing energy

Nissan Energy Supply: Providing the connected charging solutions customers need at home, on the road and at their destination
Customers want to charge their electric vehicles when it's most convenient, and the majority of charging takes place at home.

Nissan's efforts to assist customers includes verifying whether charging equipment, such as electrical sockets or wall boxes, can be connected to Nissan electric vehicles safely.

Away from home, customers can make use of the fast-growing CHAdeMO charging network – one of the world's largest, with more than 22,000 quick-charging points globally.

Finding charging locations and hooking into the network – allowing Nissan Energy Supply to come alive – is made possible through the revised Leaf navigation system and easily available NissanConnect app.

Nissan said that vehicles already on the road contain more than 10 GWh of combined storage potential. Nissan Energy Share capabilities connect the vehicles with society's infrastructure to allow them to share their high-capacity battery power with a connected home or building.

They also allow the cars to link to the local energy grid to act as virtual power plants – supplying the vehicle's power to the grid and contributing to efficient energy management. Thanks to these capabilities, customers will be able to share spare battery capacity without compromising their mobility.

Nissan has already carried out Energy Share pilot collaborating with several companies and organisations. Once the pilot tests are completed, Nissan will be ready to rapidly commercialise the systems.

  • Vehicle-to-home (V2H): Nissan is working with partners to bring inexpensive equipment to the market to popularise V2H. Using V2H, owners of Nissan electric vehicles can use their cars as a power source for the household to save money on electricity bills, or as backup power during blackouts or emergencies. This allows the usage of renewable energy when available, or when electricity is cheaper.
  • Vehicle-to-building (V2B): Similar to V2H, V2B makes use of electric vehicle batteries to store energy for buildings and businesses. However, a V2B system can involve hundreds of vehicles to realise major cost savings for a company. Full-scale trials of V2B systems have already started in many countries, and Nissan has been working with partners with the aim of bringing the systems to market in 2019.
  • Vehicle-to-grid (V2G): Nissan has formed partnerships with utility companies and governments to harness V2G capabilities. In trials in Europe, Nissan cars are providing multiple services to the electricity grid – helping balance energy networks and incorporate renewable energy. Working with partners, Nissan is piloting ways to let customers earn additional income by sharing energy from their vehicles when they are not being otherwise used, without affecting the customer's mobility needs or the health of the vehicles.

Nissan pointed out that an EV battery can be recycled and refurbished for a number of different uses – from powering electric forklifts and generators to supplying energy to a sports arena. As more and more customers switch to electric cars, the availability of used lithium-ion batteries is expected to increase significantly as owners replace their vehicles.